Speaking about my trip in Cambridge…

On Tuesday 28th April, I will be giving a short talk about my trip, the people I met, initiatives I came across and lessons I learnt. If you want to come along, please do. Details below:

Tuesday 28th April | 18.30-19.30 | Graham Storey Room, Trinity Hall | https://www.facebook.com/events/1576068459316888/

You are invited to attend a short talk by Emily Dunning, who has just returned from a 6-month trip to New Zealand, via the Trans-Mongolian Expressway, China and Japan and a few other countries in-between. She has been meeting people working on sustainability initiatives, particularly those inspiring others to take action. They vary from youth climate action groups in Taiwan to clean-up events in Russia to the social enterprise ethos inspiring change in Japan.

Expect half an hour of sharing some of her stories, introducing some of the people she met and the lessons she has learnt, then half an hour to engage in conversation about what it means for you, and the activities going on in Cambridge and the UK.

Who’s it for?
– Anyone interested in grassroots sustainability worldwide
– Those who want to hear about social enterprise in other countries
– Anyone wanting inspiration for travel
– Anyone who is a bit dissatisfied with where they’re at right now needing that gentle nudge to do something different.

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Lessons learnt, experiences in summary

A longer reflection on the headlines below can be found on the Centre for Social Innovation blog

At the risk of sounding clichéd, travelling really does re-instil the goodness of human nature.

It is difficult to live in the here and now.

Culture, society and infrastructure significantly affect how easy it is to be green.

Most common response to the greatest challenge of those working towards environmental sustainability? “Money”.

Most common response to how behaviour change is measured? “It’s difficult!”/”It’s a work in progress”.

What first motivates people to take action on environmental issues? Varied BUT common themes – teacher/parent/friend, nature, seeing injustice, having children.

And the most important three of all:

Individuals really can and do make significant changes.

Individuals who do make changes are empowered, confident, and believe in their ability to make a difference.

Connecting with others is key for creating wide-spread change.

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