It’s never quite that simple…

Mike and I had a long weekend break to visit family and friends in the South Island at the end of August. In accordance with trying to minimise the footprint of our travel (see our strategy here), we booked tickets for the ferry from Wellington to Picton and then hired a car from Picton rather than hopping on a plane.

Just now, I checked how the figures stack up regarding how much CO2e we roughly saved… the results were not as starkly different as I would have expected, showing these things are never that simple!

For a start, it is difficult finding figures that give you an accurate idea of emissions for ferries. Referring to DEFRA’s emissions conversion factors, a foot passenger on a ferry apparently uses 0.019kg CO2e per km (which would equate to 7.8kg CO2e for both of us, both ways). However, when you look at the methodology behind this figure it is calculated only for mixed passenger and freight ferries, not for passenger only ferries, which would have a higher factor. The Interislander ferry we took is predominantly a passenger ferry (to be confirmed), so I also found this higher estimate, which would put our ferry journey at 18.4kg CO2e for a return trip for two of us.

With cars I’m still not totally sure what assumptions are made with the various calculators out there – on this occasion I used co2.myclimate.org as I could enter the fuel efficiency alongside fuel type and distance travelled. So the car distance travelled from Picton to Christchurch came out at 181-206kg CO2e (for the return journey of 676km travelled, with a fuel efficiency of 6-7 litres per 100km).

This means a return journey by ferry from Wellington to Picton and car from Picton to Christchurch for two of us is 188.8-224.4kg CO2e, accounting for the variances in the estimates above.

For flights, we have previously done lots of research into flight emissions calculators and found the greatest rigour and transparency in Atmosfair’s emissions calculator. For two people taking a return flight from Wellington to Christchurch, this would be 216-271kg CO2e, depending on the aeroplane used).

Although the median value is lower for the car-ferry option compared to the plane, it shows that depending on the specific factors of the journey we took, taking a ferry and car could have had a higher footprint than flying, which I find quite shocking. I am surprised there is not a greater disparity between them, and it shows the assumptions in our carbon offsetting strategy are not absolutely steadfast.

My conclusions from this exercise:

Flying makes it easy, fast and cheap to travel long distances which is what leads to it being so impactful in terms of emissions – you can do many more long journeys as a result. Depending on the context, flying can be an efficient way to travel, it just leads to Jevons paradox i.e. it encourages more miles to be travelled thus undermining the (potential) efficiencies of the individual journey made.

This calculation shows how accurate estimates related to the specific context are really needed to have confidence in knowing for sure which one is better – given these close proximities in numbers.

In future I think we will always assume to travel in a way that avoids flying.  This means we have to take into account longer journey times and possibly more expense for going away, making it a less trivial decision to go. And then we will do the actual calculations to check if it really does result in lower carbon emissions to travel that way compared to flying…

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US road trip!

Mike and I are moving to New Zealand from the UK, making the most of the trip with a US road trip from Chicago to San Fransisco on the way. I’ve been asked if I’m going to write my blog so I’ve said I’ll just add a few photos now and again!

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First stop is Chicago, staying with our friends we’ll be roadtripping with. Contemplating the view of central Chicago from the lakeside (which you’d think was the sea!).

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Fantastic architecture tour on a river boat – definitely making us all look up and appreciate the buildings a bit more.

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On our last night in Chicago we went up the stunning Hancock tower.

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More from me soon!

 

Profiles up on sustainability efforts at two NZ universities

I was in New Zealand in January 2017 – as part of the trip I met with sustainability professionals at two of New Zealand’s eight universities, Victoria and Canterbury. This was to share learnings and experiences and compare notes with what is happening at the University of Cambridge (where I am currently working) on sustainability efforts. You can find the write ups of these meetings here: Canterbury, Christchurch and Victoria, Wellington.

VoyageVert – a sustainable alternative to flight

This seems like a great initiative to support if you’re worried about those ever increasing aviation emissions like me… http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/voyagevert-crowdfunder
 
VoyageVert are proposing a very exciting sounding alternative to flying to help tackle climate change. They also have all sorts of rewards on offer depending on what amount you want to pledge. They’ve got 5 days left to make their target so get pledging!
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The letter I just wrote to my MP

I am writing in relation to the decision made by the UK government yesterday to give the go-ahead to another runway at Heathrow. I do not see how this is compatible with the UK’s climate change agreements or how it is fair to our future generations. It will serve to increase inequalities between London and the rest of the UK, and between those who are better off compared to those with less wealth.

I am emailing to ask you to support the new parliamentary motion initiated by Caroline Lucas for a fairer, greener alternative – to put in place a frequent flyer levy. I came across A Free Ride (http://afreeride.org/) a while ago. It is an incredibly well thought-through, well researched and credible solution to deal with the issue of aviation in relation to climate change whilst also increasing social justice within the UK. I would really encourage you to have a look at the website and support the motion for a frequent flyer levy.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Yours sincerely,

Emily Dunning

PS I do not require a paper response – I am more than happy to receive an email to save money and resource.